(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "District planning program: Dorchester: existing characteristics. [separate summary]"

GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS 

DEPARTMENT 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 

DORCHESTER-EXISTING CHARACTERISTICS 

PREPARED BY THE BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 
PLANNING DEPARTMENT, SPRING, 1969 



......... t^^^r 

1. LaCATiON OF DORCHESTER 

1 AND OTHER PLANNING 

DISTRICTS IN BOSTON 




14 



East Boston 9. 

Charlestown 10. 
South Boston 

Central 11. 
Back Bay 

-Beacon Hill 12. 

South End 15. 

Fenway - Kenmore 14 . 
Allston-Brighton 



1^1 DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 

I BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 



Legend 

Dorchester 
Model Cities 
-Washington Park 
Jamaica Plain 
-Parker Hill 
Roslindale 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 




DORCHESTER- 
EXISTING CHARACTERISTICS 



PURPOSE OF REPORT 

Our purpose in preparing the following report is 
twofold: 

First, it is intended to increase our knowledge of 
Dorchester, its assets, its problems and its potentials. 
By "bringing together, quantifying and articulating the 
many trends taking place in Dorchester, we hope to have 
a better understanding of their impact on the community. 

Our second purpose is to stimulate a response from you. 
Dorchester is your community and you are most closely aware 
of its problems. While we may have succeeded in pointing 
out some things you do not know, much of what appears in 
this report is probably not new to you. What we would like 
to know is if this report accurately describes Dorchester 
as it exists today. 

We would like this report to be a working document. 
It could be used as the basis for more detailed studies 
undertaken by the Dorchester Advisory Committee on those 
issues that the community sees as important to Dorchester's 
future . 



i 

I 

I 
I 

I 

I 
I 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



I. INTRODUCTION 1 



II. DESCRIPTION OF EXISTING CHARACTERISTICS 5 

HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT 5 

POPULATION 7 

HOUSING 9 

GENERALIZED LAND USE AND BUILDING CONDITION n 

NEIGHBORHOOD DESCRIPTION 13 

VISUAL CHARACTERISTICS 23 

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION 27 

COMMUNITY FACILITIES 35 

TRANSPORTATION 47 

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS 51 

EXTERNAL INFLUENCES 55 



III. CURRENT IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMS UNDERWAY 63 

CODE ENFORCEMENT 63 

INFILL HOUSING PROGRAM 63 

TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENTS 63 

COMMUNITY FACILITIES IMPROVEMENTS 63 



IV. MAJOR ISSUES AND PLANNING IMPLICATIONS 71 

POPULATION CHANGES 71 

HOUSING DETERIORATION 73 

ABSANTEE LANDLORDS 73 

LACK OF ENOUGH HOUSING REHABILITATION FUNDING 73 
TRAFFIC CONGESTION AND COMMERCIAL DETERIORATION 

IN THE SHOPPING DISTRICTS 73 

ADDITIONAL JOB OPPORTUNITIES 75 

INADEQUATE COMMUNITY FACILITIES 75 

ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 75 



V. 



CONCLUSION 



79 



LIST OF FIGURES 



FIGURE 1 

FIGURE 2 
FIGURE 3 
FIGURE 4 
FIGURE 5 
FIGURE 6 
FIGURE 7 
FIGURE 8 

FIGURE 9 



LOCATION OF DORCHESTER AND OTHER PLANNING 
DISTRICTS 

MAP OF DORCHESTER PLANNING DISTRICT 

HISTORICAL MAP OF DORCHESTER 4 

EXISTING LAND USE (GENERALIZED) iQ 

EXISTING BUILDING CONDITION (GENERALIZED) 12 

LOCATION OF NEIGHBORHOODS IN DORCHESTER 14 

VISUAL CHARACTERISTICS OF DORCHESTER 22 

LOCATION OF THE DORCHESTER AND COLUMBIA POINT 26 
APAC SERVICE AREAS 



DUNA MEMBER SERVICE AREAS 



•28 



FIGURE 10 

FIGURE 11 

FIGURE 12 

FIGURE 13 
FIGURE 14 
FIGURE 15 

FIGURE 16 
FIGURE 17 



LOCATION OF PAROCHIAL AND PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN 34 
DORCHESTER 

LOCATION OF PUBLIC OPEN SPACE FACILITIES IN 38 
DORCHESTER OVER ONE ACRE IN SIZE 



LOCATION OF OTHER PUBLIC FACILITIES IN 
DORCHESTER 



42 



EXISTING TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM IN DORCHESTER 46 

LOCATION OF MAJOR INDUSTRIES IN DORCHESTER 50 

LOCATION OF MAJOR COMMERCIAL DISTRICTS IN 52 
DORCHESTER 



EXTERNAL INFLUENCES ON DORCHESTER 



54 



LOCATION OF CURRENT AND PROPOSED IMPROVEMENT 62 
PROGRAMS IN DORCHESTER 



LIST OF TABLES 



TABLE I POPULATION CHANGES IN DORCHESTER, 

1950, 1960 and 1965 6 

TABLE II HOUSING CHANGES IN DORCHESTER - 

1950, 1960 8 

TABLE III PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN DORCHESTER 36 

TABLE IV PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS IN DORCHESTER 37 

TABLE V PUBLIC OPEN SPACES IN DORCHESTER 40 




MAP OF DORCHESTER 
PLANNING DISTRICT 




m DORCHESTER 




DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 




INTRODUCTION 

DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 

In order to establish a meaningful planning process for 
improving Boston's neighborhoods, Mayor Kevin H. White has 
requested the Boston Redevelopment Authority's Planning 
Department to participate with the Office of Public Service 
in undertaking a DISTRICT PIAMING PROGRAM. Dorchester is 
the first in a series of planning efforts to be initiated 
under this program in areas throughout the city. The major 
focus of the District Planning Program in Dorchester will 
be to ensure that new improvement plans and programs reflect 
the expressed needs and desires of its residents in mutual 
cooperation with the city's administration. 

To this end and to develop community consensus on a 
number of planning issues, a Dorchester Advisory Committee 
(D.A.C. ) will be established by the Dorchester community 
with the assistance of the Neighborhood Service Center 
(little city hall) managers. The D.A.C. will bring together 
people from all over Dorchester who represent a cross -section 
of community Interests and needs. In turn, the Boston 
Redevelopment Authority Planning Department will provide 
technical planning assistance to the D.A.C. with the 
cooperation of the Neighborhood Service Center Manager. 

The main products of the Dorchester District Planning 
Program will be: 

1. A report on existing conditions, problems, assets 
and opportunities in Dorchester. 

2o The establishment of a process for: 

(a) undertaking immediate actions to meet pressing 
needs 

(b) developing longer range plans for programmed 
improvement of public facilities, housing, recreation, 
business and industry and other subjects of community 
interest. In addition, the BRA staff will develop 
interim reports on specific issues and on the entire 
program as requested by the Dorchester Advisory Committee. 

This report along with a summary report on Dorchester's 
neighborhoods represent the first products of the Dorchester 
District Planning Program o They can be used to develop 
a common understanding among residents and city staff of 
the problems, assets and opportunities to be considered in 
formulating plans for Dorchester's futxireo 



1 




HISTORICAL MAP OF DORCHESTER 

DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 



I 



DESCRIPTION OF 

EXISTING CHARACTERISTICS 



HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT 

In 1630, when the town of Dorchester was founded. Its 
boundaries stretched from the neck of the Boston Peninsula 
to the Rhode Island border. By 1700, the town's holdings 
diminished roughly to its present size.- 

The topography of Dorchester, consisting of gentle slopes 
and few steep hills provided suitable farmland for early 
settlers. While its lengthy shoreline was thought to be 
useful for shipping and trading in colonial times, neither 
prospered. However, the Neponset River provided a valuable 
source of power which permitted a small raanuf actioring area 
to develop along its borders. 

The development of manufacturing at this location accom- 
plished two things: first, it closed off and completed 
Dorchester's southern boundary thus giving the town definition; 
second, because of its location and topography, it formed 
a gateway to Boston from the south via what is now 
Dorchester Avenue. 

The rural character of Dorchester was to change radically 
in the last quarter of the nineteenth century with the 
development of the first horsedrawn street railroad line 
which established service from the South End to Roxbury 
Crossing o The beginnings of this development coincided with 
the annexation of the town by the City of Boston in 1870. 

As Dorchester grew, the original rural community centers 
were joined by others, such as Codman Square, Upharas Corner, 
Meeting House Hill, Everett Square, Peabody Square and 
Fields Corner. In addition, greater accessibility to Boston 
transformed Dorchester from farmland to a "streetcar suburb" 
of an expanding major city. 

In the 1870' s, great numbers of middle income families 
moved to Dorchester. The former farms offered large tracts 
of land which were rapidly subdivided. The appearance of 
cross-town streetcar lines, connecting Dorchester to Roxbury 
and points further west, provided the impetus for additional 
residential development « This new housing took the form 
of three decker and other multiple unit structures constructed 
on available vacant land, often distant from the original 
streetcar lines o This building boom continued into the very 
early 20th century and exhausted itself when most of the 
developable land had been utilized. 

Today, Dorchester is composed primarily of older, 
residential neighborhoods o However, there is still relatively 
little industry in the area, and as in the past, the old 
centers along with the many churches are the centers of 
community activity. 



5 



O 
I 



o 



o 





LO 


LO 




to 


H 


LO 






to 




CO 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


O 






H 




O 


o 






o 


00 


o 


1 


1 


+ 


1 


1 




1 


+ 


+ 


1 


1 



C 
I 



O 





CD 


o 


LO 


CD 


O 


00 


H 




00 


o 


CD 


H 




CO 


CO 


CD 


OO 




CO 


OJ 


CD 


t~- 


CO 


LO 


a> 


LO 


o 


LO 


O 


w 


(XI 






rH 


H 


H 


r-\ 



CO 
OJ 
NO 



to 


00 


CO 


rH 




O 


CD 


LO 


LO 




CO 


CO 


OO 








00 


OO 


CVI 


to 


to 


LO 


CD 


CO 



OO 

o 



CD 

H 



H 



CD 



O 





LO 






(J) 


CD 


o 


CD 






LO 


LO 




H 






O 




















H 


H 




rH 




O 


H 


H 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 



CD 



H 
+ 



LO 

CD 



O 





00 


O 


OO 


O 


to 


CO 


CD 


rH 


g 


CD 


CD 


^o 




CD 




O 


O 


CD 






CO 








CM 


CVO 




to 


CO 


s 


00 


to 


00 




s 


to 


to 


to 


CD 


H 


H 


lO 




O 


CD 


00 


LO 


O 


00 




to 


to 


CD 


OO 


to 


to 


LO 




CD 






H 


H 




H 


H 


H 


H 








H 


CD 


to 


o 


CO 


O 






O 


O 




rH 


H 


o 


CD 






OO 




o 


00 


s 


CO 




OO 






H 


to 




rH 


OO 


to 




r~ 


(M 




o 


to 




lO 


to 


to 


CO 






»\ 








*\ 


•\ 
















•\ 




r- 


o 




00 


O 




lO 


CD 




to 


to 


to 


LO 




CO 




H 




H 


OO 




H 


H 


rH 


H 








H 



fo 



o 



to 



o 

CD 

to 

00 
CD 
H 



O 
•H 













H 
















H 
















•H 









































?H 


u 






(D 






CO 


03 


0) 


•H 




CO 




0) 


:i 




o 






fl 




-p 


a" 




PM 


H 


O 


•H 




0) 


CO 


o 


H 




O 


o 




o 


cd 


•H 






o 




-P 




•H 












-P 


m 








o 


CO 




0) 






a 


•H 


m 






^^ 


J 




•H 


+3 








0) 




H 




CD 











ft 


O 




(U 




•H 


s 




!=> 


O 


CO 


S 




&4 


rH 


CVJ 


to 




LO 


CD 




00 



H 
0) 
•H 

a 

•H 



CD 



0) 

u 

I 

CO 



o 
o 

CD 
H 



-P 

a 
o 



CO 
< 



H 



H 
H 
•H 



0) 

ft 
o 



00 

H 



+3 

<u 
CO 

a 
o 
ft 



to 



(D 

> 
o 
u 

C5 



0) 

o 



CO 
H 

rH 
•H 

o 
1^ 



LO 
H 



cd 
ft 
cd 
-P 
-P 

I 



CD 
H 



EH 

O 

EH 



CD 



POPULATION 



Dorchester is the largest district in Boston in 
terms of population and area. In 1965, the population 
of 149,000 was nearly one quarter of Boston's popula- 
tion. However, Dorchester's population is decreasing, 
but not ciuite as rapidly as the city as a whole. In 
1950, for example, Dorchester's population was 162,000 
but decreased to about 153,000 in 1960. Areas experi- 
encing the greatest population losses were New Market 
Siiuare, Uphams Corner, Fields Corner and Codman Square. 

The population density is relatively balanced throughout 
the area with a slight increase in density in the northern 
neighborhoods. The most dense area is Columbia Point where 
over 5,300 persons live in the public housing project. 

Three ethnic groups are predominant in Dorchester: Irish 
Russian and Canadian. The Irish are dispersed throughout the 
district with slight concentrations in Pope's Hill, Ashmont 
and Fields Corner. The Russians (primarily Jewish) are 
concentrated in Franklin Field and Mattapan. Canadians 
are dispersed evenly throughout Dorchester. 

Althoiogh the percentage of non-white families living 
in Dorchester in 1960 was small, the number has risen con- 
siderably in recent years. Most of these families have 
migrated from the South End and Roxbury into Northern Dor- 
chester and more recently along Blue Hill Avenue towards 
Mattapan. In addition, according to Action for Boston 
Community Development statistics for 1967, approximately 
55^ of Columbia Point's population was black. These 
statistics and other observations point to a significajit 
change in ethnic composition in Dorchester, particularly along 
its western edge and at Columbia Point. 

Consistent with the pattern of population movements in 
large central cities in the United States since the end of 
World War II, young people have been moving to the suburbs 
leaving their parents and grandparents behind. For example, 
in Dorchester, the only age group to diminish between 1950 
and 1960 was the age group 18-39 years, or the young, pro- 
ductive populations During the same period, the proportion 
of the population 65 years or older increased slightly. 

Finally, median family income in Dorchester in 1960 
($6,200)was higher than in Boston as a whole ($5,700). 

In summary, Dorchester's population is decreasing slowly, 
as well as experiencing changes in ethnic and age compositions. 



7 



ft 
a 

H 
•H 

;3 



5-1 

CD 
53DI-P 







xi 



o 



o 

H 



o 



o 



o 



o 



o 



o 



d 



CO 



00 



H 
LO 



OO 
00 



o 



CD 



o 



CD 



d 



CD 

CD 



LO 

d 



lO 

d 



CO 

d 



d 



NO 



^0 



en 

00 



(T) 



03 



lO 



CD 

cn 



NO 



CO 



LO 

CO 



00 

d 
H 



00 
CD 



H 
CD 



o 


00 


O 


CD 


o 


CD 


CD 


00 


00 


to 




o 


to 




H 


SO 


OO 


H 


LO 


to 




H 


to 




to 


00 


H 


lO 




00 



H 
H 



O 



CD 



OJ 

to 



H 
H 



00 
LO 
OO 













H 






















cS 








Hil 






















qu 


(U 






OJ 






±0. 


OJ 














CO 


cS 


0) 


* 


cn 






OJ 














o 




:3 


c: 




;3 


d 


d 


•H 


03 










CO 


o 


+» 




u 


rH 


o 


•H 


!h 




d 




H 




> 


H 




0) 


CO 


o 


H 




o 


o 






•H 




o 


H 








o 


•H 






o 


d 


CO 






-P 




•H 


o 




-p 












•H 










a 


2 




03 


-p 








o 


CO 








CO 


CD 










0) 




c! 


•H 










o 




d 


u 


5h 






^ 




•H 


•P 




H 


d 






(U 


o 


n3 




•H 


> 






> 


(U 


• 


OJ 








ft 


ft 




> 




OJ 


Ev 


ft 


CO 






•H 


u 


o 


CO 


o 




0) 


o 




z 




CO 










o 


< 


Ph 




o 





d 



to 

CD 



LO 

to 



CO 

• 




O 




CD 


LO 


CD 




to 


CO 


00 


to 


^0 


CD 


O 


to 


CD 


LO 




CD 


O 


00 


o 


to 








CO 


to 


o 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 




CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CD 



LO 


CD 


CD 


CD 


H 


00 


rH 


H 


CD 


00 


00 




CO 


00 


OO 






CVI 




LO 


OJ 


CD 


O 


LO 


I-- 








CD 


lO 






00 






to 






LO 






LO 


CD 


00 


































,H 


oa 


o 




00 


H 






to 






H 


H 


LO 


CD 

to 



o 








H 


to 




CD 


to 


NO 


LO 


LO 




CO 


LO 






• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 










o 


O 


ro 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


d 


H 


• 




1 


1 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


o 



o 


H 


LO 


o 




LO 






o 


r— 








CO 


CD 


CD 


CD 




00 




H 


H 


NO 


CO 


00 




O 


LO 


CO 


CO 








LO 


O 


CD 




00 


CO 


CD 


00 


CD 




•\ 






*\ 


















*\ 


H 


00 




LO 


OO 


H 


LO 




to 






H 


CO 


LO 


N-) 


rH 




LO 


o 


O 




LO 


8 


CO 


CO 




00 


-H 


CD 


CD 


LO 


CO 


LO 


CO 


o 


CD 








LO 


o 


00 


CD 


CO 


to 


NO 


CD 




CD 


r~- 


CD 


CO 


CO 


LO 


CD 


•s 
















*\ 












H 


00 


^0 


LO 


00 


rH 






to 






H 


cvj 


H< 



d 
cci 
ft 

ct3 
+J 
-P 



Q 



CO 



HOUSING 



In 1960, over half of Dorchester's 44,000 housing units 
were located in three and four imit structures. Most of 
these units were found in triple decker buildings and were 
characterized by spacious living accommodations at moderate 
rents. An additional one third of the housing stock was 
located in other types of multi-unit apartment structures. 
Single family units, although fewer in nioraber, comprised 
15^ of Dorchester's housing stock. The number of the housing 
units in 1960 representedaVfo increase over the number of 
units in 1950. This increase reflected the construction of 
the Columbia Point HousingProject , as well as single 



family dwellings and new apartment buildings, L-The newf 
private housing imits built during this period were con- 
structed primarily in the southern neighborhoods (l,750 
new units in contrast to 85 new units in northern neigh- 
borhoods), thus reflecting the location of large tracts 
of developable land in southern neighbor hoods'J Since 1960, 
new apartment construction in Dorchester has continued, 
yet the area experienced a slight population loss. 

In general, Dorchester's housing stock is old as 90^ 
of the units were constructed before 1939; however, only 
12^ of the housing units were considered deteriorating by 
the 1960 Census of Housing o The Boston Redevelopment Authority 
Planning Department surveys of 1968 indicated that deteriora- 
tion was increasing, particularly in the northern neighborhoods. 

-The 1960 median gross rent paid in Dorchester was $86 
as compared to $78 for the City of Boston. However, while 
rent levels have soared greatly in many parts of Boston since 
then, rents in Dorchester have increased only moderately. 

About half of the 3,000 units of public housing in 
Dorchester are located at Columbia Point. The remainder 
of the units are located in nine different areas, including 
many in the southern neighborhoods. Most of the \mits are for 
families, and less than 400 units are for elderly persons. 

In sum, the housing stock of Dorchester is increasing 
slightly. However, housing deterioration is increasing 
considerably in the northern neighborhoods and in the areas 
generally south of Franklin Field. 




9 




EXISTING LAND USE 
(GENERALIZED) 

Legend 

lliilllii Industrial 
:voSvW>&S'S Residential 
Institutional 
Vacant 

ice 





DORCHESTER 

DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 



GENERALIZED LAND USE 
AND BUILDING CONDITION 



Land Use 

Dorchester, like many long -established coramunities in 
the Boston area, is typical in its land use patterns. 
Residential uses are found throughout the district. Commercial 
uses line the major streets in long strips which form 
shopping districts at intersections. Industrial uses are 
located along railroad tracks, close to residential areas. 
Small schools and parks are located throughout the community. 

Unlike many of the older coramimities, Dorchester has 
a predominance of unusually large city parks, playfields and 
"beaches in moderately high density residential areas. In 
addition, many specialized institutional facilities such as 
major hospitals and religious seminaries are unusually common, 
particularly in the southern portions of Dorchester. 

In many instances, the land use patterns in Dorchester 
are in conflict and result in adverse effects such as 
deterioration. Examples of this include the inappropriate 
and' haphazard mixing of industrial and residential uses. 
In addition, the dual use of major streets for through 
traffic and parking causes congestion, particularly in 
shopping districts. In general, however, the dominant 
residential character of Dorchester is preserved. 

Building Condition 



The conditions of buildings in Dorchester range from 
well-kept new and older homes which are found primarily in 
the southernmost portion of the district to blighted vacant 
structures found mostly in the northern areas. Buildings in 
need of major repairs are located near railroad and transit 
lines, and elevated portions of the Southeast Expressway. 

Generalized building conditions in Dorchester can be 
described as fair with definite concentrations of good 
structures located in the southernmost area. Small pockets 
of buildings in poor condition are found scattered throughout 
the entire district. 



11 



EXISTING BUILDING 
CONDITION (GENERALIZED 



Legend 



Buildings in need of 
major repairs 

Buildings in need of 
minor repairs 

Buildings in good 
condition 

Vacant land areas 





DORCHESTER 

DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 




NEIGHBORHOOD DESCRIPTION 



A more specific description of land use, building 
condition and environmental characteristics by neighborhood 
in Dorchester follows: 

1. New Market Square - This predominantly industrial 
area is located in the northernmost part of Dorchester. 
The newer buildings in the recently planned industrial 
development around New Market Square are in good condition. 

2. Edward Everett Square - Edward Everett Square, a 
large commercial district at the intersection of Massachu- 
setts Avenue and Columbia Road, is bordered on the north 
by large tracts of vacant and industrial lando Nearby 
are gradually deteriorating, residential areas which are 
experiencing the negative effects of industrial noise and 
traffic. Of particular interest is the Dorchester Historical 
Society where there are two good examples of early American 
architecture . 

3. Uphams Corner - Uphams Corner is predominantly a 
residential area with a shopping district at the inter- 
section of Dudley Street and Columbia Road. Housing is 
deteriorating near the railroad tracks, but in other areas, 
housing is still in fair condition. A few facilities 
available for community use are located in an old municipal 
building on Columbia Road. 

4. Colijmbia Point - Colijmbia Point is an area built 
primarily on land fill and consists of a large public 
housing project, an antiquated but architecturally inter- 
esting sewerage treatment plant, Boston College High School 
and new developments such as a large shopping center, two 
public schools and numerous large commercial activities. 
Although good views of Dorchester Bay are available from 
the Point, water -oriented access points and facilities are 
not provided. Much of the land, however, remains undeveloped. 
The one large playground, for example, is unlandscaped and 
poorly maintained. Despite new development, the peninsula 
community remains isolated from other neighborhoods of 
Dorchester . 

5. Savin Hill - Savin Hill is a large, residential 
area split by several non-residential uses. The section 
containing Savin Hill Park is separated from the remainder of 
the community by the Southeast Expressway. This area contains 
some fine, old houses and is potentially one of the most desirable 
parts of Dorchester. In addition, a large industrial concentration 



13 




LOCATION OF 
NEIGHBORHOODS 
IN DORCHESTER 






DORCHESTER 

DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 




along the west side of the Penn Central railroad tracks 
is contributing to the continued deterioration of the area 
from Bay Street to Freeport Street . These industrial and 
expressway uses also separate the residential areas from 
one of Dorchester's two public beaches^ Malibu Beach. 

Although consisting of a mixture of incompatible 
uses, Savin Hill has several assets. The housing, except 
for scattered pockets of deterioration, is generally in 
satisfactory condition. The area affords excellent hilltop 
views from Gushing and Sawyer Avenues in the west and from 
Grampian Way and Savin Hill Avenue in the east . Malibu 
Beach, if properly developed and linked to the community, 
would provide a greater source of recreation for the resi- 
dents of Savin Hill and nearby communities. 

6. Meeting House Hill - Meeting House Hill is a 
predominantly residential community characterized by 
gradually deteriorating housing and a few large parcels 

of vacant land. There are blighted commercial concentrations 
along Bowdoin Street and Washington Street. Ronan Park 
and Dorchester Square, however, are definite community 
assets. Ronan Park is situated atop a hill and provides a 
panoramic view of Dorchester Bay. Dorchester Square, with 
its two large churches, is one of the most attractive squares 
in the city. 

7. Mt. Bowdoin - The Mt . Bowdoin area is a residential 
community composed of sound structures. There are some 
particularly fine homes on Melville Street, for example. 
The area west of Washington Street, however, is beginning 

to show signs of deterioration. Bulk storage and light 
manufacturing plants are mixed with homes in this area and 
much property neglect is evident along the Penn Gentral tracks. 
The area's major commercial concentrations are found along 
Washington Street and Geneva Avenue, and traffic is very 
heavy on Washington Street especially near its intersection 
with Bowdoin Street. Many of these commercial buildings 
are one or two story structures and lack off street parking, 
further contributing to traffic congestion. This part of 
the community also contains a few large parcels of vacant 
land. 

8. Fields Corner - The Fields Corner area is character- 
ized as generally deteriorating with residential uses 
occupying less than half of its land area. At least one 
third of the dwellings are in poor condition requiring major 
repairs. Junkyards and industrial buildings primarily used 
for warehousing and light manufacturing are mixed with homes 
between Adams Street and the Penn Central tracks. This 



15 



I 
I 

I 
I 
I 

p 

I 

I 



I 



mixtirre of incompatible uses along with several large 
tracts of vacant land is also found along Freeport Street 
between Morrissey Boulevard and the Southeast Expressway. 
The neighborhood is the site of the newly opened Neigh- 
borhood Service Center (little city hall), a community 
library now under construction and a multi-purpose community 
center. Fields Corner is also characterized by a large 
number of shopping facilities, including a fairly new 
shopping center. These are located along Adams Street, 
Freeport Street and especially along Dorchester Avenue. 

9. Franklin Field - The Franklin Field neighborhood 

is the location of one of the largest commercial concentra- 
tions in Dorchester. This development, situated in the 
vicinity of Woodrow and Blue Hill Avenues, provides a variety 
of services for many shoppers. Industrial companies are 
prevalent along the Midland Division of the New York - New 
Haven Railroad. In addition, various small manufacturing 
companies are found on Blue Hill Avenue. Homes in the 
Franklin Field neighborhood are primarily in fair to 
poor condition. However, new housing is planned in the 
Lena Park area. Buildings in need of major repairs are 
adjacent to the railroad, with better housing in evidence 
as the distance from the railroad increases. The area 
has an enormous asset in its extensive parkland which 
provides many recreational activities for Dorchester 
residents. A second asset, when completed, will be the 
new Joseph Lee School. 

10. Codman Square - While the neighborhood is predominantly 
residential, the housing has not been well maintained and 
buildings are in fair to poor condition. The area's major 
commercial concentrations are located in Codman Square and 
extend south on Washington Street and east on Talbot Avenue. 

In the main square, the 2nd Church In Dorchester is a 
landmark. Some light industry and manufacturing is also 
located in this neighborhood. Light industry is found 
along Washington Street while intensive manufacturing occurs 
along the Penn Central tracks. Two major commionity facilities, 
Dorchester High School and the Roberts Playground, are 
located in this neighborhood. 

11. Ashmont - Ashmont is primarily a residential 
community composed of a large number of sound structures. 
Homes in poor condition are adjacent to major streets. The 
neighborhood has many commercial outlets which are also 
located along all major streets o The largest of these 
commercial developments is situated at Peabody Square. 
Industry is predominantly light manufacturing, with small 
firms located along Washington Street and Dorchester Avenue. 
This area is particularly well served by rapid transit, 
with the Ashmont Station easily accessible to all neighbor- 
hood residents. In addition, Ashmont is also the location 
of Wilson Junior High and Dorchester High School Annex. 



17 



12. Pope's Hill - The western section of Pope's Hill 
is characterized by well -maintained homes. Good views 
from Pope's Hill along with some excellent groupings of 
three-decker housing form pleasant visual environments, 
particularly on South Monroe Street and Whittier Street. 
Although the eastern boundary of Pope's Hill borders 
Dorchester Bay, no recreation areas have been developed 
along the shore. However, two sizable playgrounds (McMorrow 
and Hemenway) are located elsewhere in the neighborhood. 

13. Neponset - This relatively small area is separated 
from the rest of Dorchester by the Southeast Expressway at 
Neponset Circle. The area, sometimes referred to as Port 
Norfolk, borders Dorchester Bay and contains a small 
residential area sxirrounded by several marine -oriented 
industrial and commercial uses. The structures in this 
section are in fair to poor condition, with some good 
examples of Victorian architecture. The major recreation 
area is Tenean Beach. 

14. Cedar Grove - Cedar Grove is a residential 
community of homes in good condition, with commercial con- 
centrations on Gallivan Boulevard and Adams Street . The 
only major industrial uses are between the Southeast Express- 
way and the Neponset River. Major community facilities 
include the Adams Street Library and a fire station. 

15. Lower Mills - Lower Mills is a largely residential 
community which shares a common border with the town of 
Milton. The housing is generally well-maintained as are 
the streets, sidewalks and yards. There is a concentration 
of industrial, commercial and institutional uses at Pierce 
Square. This development includes several industrial firms 
which are housed in old, but well-kept mills, and the 
antiquated Lower Mills branch of the Boston Public Library., 
The industrial firms are located in a nimber of large and 
handsome 19th century mill buildings. The topography, the 
river and the arrangement of these buildings have created 

a potentially handsome space. East of Pierce Square at 
River Street and Central Avenue is Lower Mills Plaza, a 
new shopping center. Several large open spaces lie within 
Lower Mills including Neponset Reservation and Dorchester 
Parko Although Neponset Reservation remains chiefly un- 
developed, some recreation area is available to community 
residents. Among the area's institutional facilities is 
Carney Hospital » 

16. Mattapan - Mattapan is a residential neighborhood 
which is composed of well -maintained homes needing few major 
repairs. Mattapan Square contains a large, commercial center 
that branches radially from the square along Blue Hill Avenue, 
River Street and Cummins Highway. Light industry is inter- 
spersed with commercial establishments on Blue Hill Avenue 
while heavy manufacturing is confined to Mildred 



19 



street and an area adjacent to the New York - New Haven 
Railroad. The neighborhood has abundant vacant land near 
the Square and large tracts of unutilized land which adjoin 
the Preventorium. Prominent community facilities in the 
area are the Boston Sanitorium and Preventorium, the Almont 
Street and George Walker Playgrounds and the Mattapan "little 
city hall." Mattapan Square is also one of Boston's major 
gateways. The Milton approach and the river bridge empha- 
size this, however, the disjointed character of the commercial 
development dissipate this effect on the Boston side. 

Summary 

With the exception of New Market Square and portions 
of Fields Corner, Dorchester is predominantly residential 
in character. Housing conditions in the district vary from 
neighborhood to neighborhood. Contributors to deterioration 
of buildings and facilities in these neighborhoods include 
ownership neglect and incompatible mixtures of land uses in 
residential neighborhoods. The Fields Corner neighborhood 
however, contains some of the area's worst housing conditions. 
Throughout the area, there are areas of considerable visual 
appeal, groups of fine buildings and points with excellent 
vistas. The entire study area, however, is presently in 
a state of decline, and it is evident that steps will need 
to be taken if its quality as a stable, residential community 
is to be preserved. 



21 




7 I VISUAL CHARACTERISTI 
OF DORCHESTER 



Legend 



Major Square 



llllllllll Visual Barrier 
Landmark 
Open Space 
Major Path 
■ ■ ■ ■ Secondary Path 



^Hlll 





DORCHESTER 

DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 




VISUAL CHARACTERISTICS 



One of the important environmental elements which 
comprise a district, but which is often overlooked by the 
residents of such a district, as well as planners attempting 
to study it, is its visual dimension. The visual dimension 
consists of things large and small, natural and manmade; it 
includes: views and vistas created by topographical features, 
the character of the streets or paths of travel, the place- 
ment of landmarks which orient travelers, the design of 
individual or groups of buildings, or even of such mundane 
elements as fire hydrants, signs or park benches. Where 
natural features are capitalized upon, where there is visual 
concern in street design, where landmarks are emphasized 
and the character of good buildings are enhanced, and where 
concern for the design of simple street furnishings is 
evident, the legibility and visual experience of a district 
can be greatly improved. Where such assets are realized 
a person can better understand where he is in his district 
and find his way more easily. More importantly, a person 
can begin to look at his district or neighborhood in a 
different light. What once may have been taken fcr granted 
can become a source of pride creating a sense of home and 
a new stake in his community. 

As the first step in evaluating the visual aspects 
of Dorchester, a two-part siirvey was conducted. The first 
part attempted to determine Dorchester's "visual structure." 
That is, the system of major streets, important landmarks, 
topographical features, definable neighborhoods and major 
activity centers (in Dorchester, the important squares), 
which should constitute a person's visual or geographical 
comprehension of the district. Figure 7 is a symbolic 
representation of these structural featiares. 

The second part of the sirrvey considered the "visual 
elements" of the district. It included a cataloguing of 
views and vistas, of streets with street trees and of visually 
important individual and groups of buildings. Where possible 
these elements were rated as "assets", "liabilities" and 
"potentialities". By "overlaying" this information on 
the structural map, the area possessing the greatest visual 
importance and potentiality can be determined. 

The survey determined that Dorchester has its share 
of visual assets and liabilities » It is, for instance, rich 
in landmarks and distinguished old buildings like the First 
Parish Church, the Lithgow Building in Codman Square and 
Saint Gregory's Church. It has its liabilities in much of 



23 



Laadm8Lrk-2nd Church Dorchester -Codman Square 
Lower Mills - handsome gateway to Boston 



Historic Meeting House Hill 
M6,ttapan Sauare - asphalt and signs 




the strip commercial development along Dorchester Avenue 
and Gallivan Boulevard, and in the industrial area near 
Talbot Avenue and the Penn Central tracks. 

But Dorchester is richest in potentialities. These 
potentialities lie in the greater exploitation of three im- 
portant aspects of its visual character: its squares, its 
residential neighborhoods and its topographical features. 

The squares are important not only because they now 
provide necessary services and activities for the area but 
because they have been historically the centers of Dorchester. 
Meeting House Hill and Lower Mills, where topography, good 
buildings and siting combine to create places of great visual 
interest, have maintained their historic character. Lower 
Mills still serves as a dramatic "gateway" to Boston, and 
the square at Meeting House Hill not only enhances the area, 
but gives it a sense of identity. However, other squares, 
like Mattapan and Fields Corner, are rapidly losing their 
character and becoming bland areas of commercial strip 
development overpowered by a chaotic array of signs and 
billboards . 

Dorchester's residential neighborhoods are dominated by 
the "triple deckers." These structures occur in such numbers 
and were so economically important to Dorchester's develop- 
ment that they have become the visual symbol of the district. 
Where large groups are in poor repair, on poorly maintained 
streets, the neighborhood becomes visually bland and monoton- 
ous. However, in areas where large groups are we 11 -painted 
and where streets are clean and enhanced with generous street 
trees, the visual identity of the neighborhood is strengthened 
and its character can be truly handsome and dignified. 

Dorchester's many hills and its shoreline present many 
opportunities for visual interest. The views from Savin 
Hill enhance the character of the area, but on other hills, 
no viewpoints are provided. Most of the Dorchester shore- 
line is cut off from its residents. The park near Malibu 
Beach provides a fine view of the harbor, but the more 
spectacular views from Columbia Point are not exploited. 

To make such a survey complete, it is necessary to get 
a sampling of the residents' perspective to determine what 
is visually important to them. A questionnaire designed to 
obtain a sampling of this perspective will be prepared and 
distributed with the assistance of the advisory committee. 
The blending of viewpoints of residents and planners should 
achieve an accurate reflection of what areas have the most 
potential and are most important. This, in turn, will deter- 
mine the main target areas for enhancement and preservation 
programs to capitalize on Dorchester's visual character. 



25 



LOCATION OF THE 
DORCHESTER AND 
COLUMBIA POINT APAC 
SERVICE AREAS 





DORCHESTER 

DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 




COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION 



Dorchester is highly organized at "both the district 
and neighborhood levels. Residents of the planning area look 
to a variety of organizations for leadership and support 
for community endeavors. Very often, these groups collaborate 
on particular projects which involve a broad base of the 
area's population. The predominant organizing groups are 
the Area Planning Action Councils (APAC), Neighborhood 
Association groups, churches and the settlement houses. 
While APAC groups and settlement houses play a significant 
role in the northern neighborhoods of Dorchester, APAC 
affects only a small percentage of the population in the 
southern neighborhoods. Settlement houses are non-existent 
in the southern area. Brief descriptions of these organiza- 
tions follow: 

1. Area Planning Action Council (APAC) 

Two APAC groups serve the Dorchester Planning Area: 
the Dorchester APAC serves the bulk of the northern neigh- 
borhoods of Dorchester, while the Columbia Point APAC 
serves the residents of the Point Project. In addition to 
providing many social service oriented activities, tht,- 
APACs perform an important community leadership function, 
particularly for the low-income residents of Dorchester.. 
Examples of their programs include job training and place- 
ment centers, English language programs, construction of tot 
lots and play areas and other self-help endeavors. 

2. Neighborhood Associations 

The Neighborhood Associations in Dorchester are pre- 
dominantly organized around three main purposes: 

ao To foster neighborhood maintenanct; and improvement 
such as street improvement, housing rehabilitation, police 
protection, parking, civic pride, and the continuance of 
the social and residential character of neighborhoods. 

b. To promote better communication of neighborhood 
leaders with government officials . 

c. To attack specific problems on an Ad Hoc basis. For 
example, the need for a playground may provide an impetus to 
form an association. After the need is satisfied, the associa- 
tion may become inactive and remain dormant until a new 
crisis arises. 



27 




DUNA MEMBER 
SERVICE AREAS 



1. Dorchester Dudley Council 

2. Dorchester -Roxbury Line Association 
Columbia Civic Association 



Meeting House Hill Improvement Association 
Field's Corner Neighborhood Association 
Mt. Bowdoin Codraan Action Association 
Neponset Civic Association 



8. Popes Hill Neighborhood Association 

9. Ashmont Neighborhood Association 
10, Ward 14 Betterment Association 
H. Cedar Grove Civic Association 





DORCHESTER 



DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 




In carrying out their programs, these groups operate 
either independently or in conjunction with the Dorchester 
United Neighborhood Association (DUNA), an umbrella organiza- 
tion whose membership includes associations representing 
defined geographical areas throughout Dorchester. The 
following is a listing of known neighborhood associations in 
Dorchester. Those indicated by an asterisk {*) are members 
of DUNA. 

Name of 
Association 



Ashmont Neighborhood 
Association 



Concerned with physical improve- 
ments, i. e,, buildings and streets 



Cedar Grove Civic 
Association 



To insure livable conditions of 
the neighborhood. 



Columbia Civic 
Association (Savin Hill) 



A tenant association within 
housing development. 



Columbia Point Develop- 
ment Council 



Functions as Neighborhood Board 
for the APAC at Coliambia Point 



Determined People of 
Dorchester 



Concerned with the establishment of 
a mult i -service center replacement 
for Dorchester House » 



Dorchester APAC Board 



Concerned with the operation of 
the Dorchester Neighborhood Action 
Center . 



Dorchester Dudley 
Council (Uphams Corner ) 



Concerned with effective community 
action in the North Dorchester- 
Roxbury area. 



Dorchester -Mat t apan 
Civic Association 



Concerned with community improvements 



Dorchester -Roxbury Line 
Association (Uphams 
Corner ) 



Concerned with neighborhood 
improvement . 



Fields Corner Neighbor- 
hood Association 



Concerned with general community 
improvements, civic pride, housing, 
streets, sidewalks. 



Franklin Hill Community 
Council 



Concerned with neighborhood im- 
provement in the Franklin Field and 
Franklin Hill area. 



29 



I 

II 
li 
II 
11 

il 

il 

I 
i 

m 

m 
m 
■i 

m 



Lena Park Association 



Concerned with housing improvements 
and multi-service center in their 
area. 



The Mattapan Organization Improvement of area and race 

relations . 



* Meeting House Hill 
Improvement Assn. 



Working with various city depart- 
ments for improved services . 



* Mt . Bowdoin Codman 
Action Assn. 



Concerned with better living 
conditions . 



* Neponset Civic Assn. 



Presently inactive. 



* Pope's Hill Neighborhood Neighborhood improvement 
Assn. 



* Ward 14 Betterment Neighborhood improvement. 

Association (Meeting House 
Hill and Codman Square, 
Lorne, Talbot, Model Cities) 

3, Other Community Organizations 

In addition to the APACs and the Neighborhood Associa- 
tions, there are a number of other groups whose purposes 
include betterment of the community. These include such 
organizations as: 



Dorchester Interagency 
Coimcil 



Community Service professionals 
interested in improving the delivery 
of health and social welfare services 
in Dorchester. 



Dorchester Steering 
Committee 

Dorchester Clergy Assn. 



Dorchester Board of 
Trade 

Mattapan Board of 
Trade 

Dorchester Historical 
Society 



Citizens' group interested in 
planning for new schools. 

Inter -faith group of clergymen 
interested in community improvement. 

Businessmen interested in promotion 
of economic development. 

Businessmen interested in promotion 
of economic development. 

Community people interested in 
preserving historical landmarks in 
Dorchester . 



31 



4. The Churches 



Perhaps one of the most valuable, yet relatively- 
untapped resources for community participation and organiza- 
tion, are the many churches of all faiths in the study area. 
Predominant among these are the Roman Catholic parishes 
serving the strong, Irish Catholic population and which 
function as major focal points of community life at the 
neighborhood level. Many synagogues in the Mattapan area 
serve a large, thoiAgh declining, Jewish population in 
that neighborhood. 

5 . Settlement Houses 

The Dorchester Federation of Settlement Houses composed 
of the Denison House, Little House, Dorchester House and 
the Columbia Point Center provide not only social, health 
and recreational services to the community but are also 
important elements in the organizational structure of 
Dorchester. In this capacity, they have often been vocal 
advocates for neighborhood improvement o 



33 




LOCATION OF PUBLIC 
AND PAROCHIAL SCHOOL 

N DORCHESTER 



Legend 



elementary school 



intermediate school 



high school 



Note: numbers refer to 
public schools and letters 
refer to parochial schools and 
are listed on Tables III & IV. 





DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 



COMMUNITY FACILITIES 



The provision and improvement of community facilities is 
a major focus of the District Planning Program. A discussion 
of the existing facilities and their condition is important 
in developing a plan for their improvement. 

The following paragraphs describe the status of public 
as well as some private commimity facilities in the Dor- 
chester Planning Area: 

1. Schools 

Public Schools - During the 1968-69 school year, over 
25,000 students were enrolled in the 41 public school lo- 
cated in the Dorchester Planning Area. The study area is 
served by 3 high schools, 5 junior high schools, 3 middle 
schools and 31 elementary schools. These schools are 
located in 13 elementary school districts. In addition, 
the planning area includes portions of 5 other elementary 
school districts, but the schools are not located in the 
planning area. 

Many of the public schools are small, old, overcrowded 
and are located on inadequate sites. In some cases, several 
small schools are located within a few blocks from each 
other, while others are much further apart. Although the 
study area has 2 of the city's newer schools (the Dever and 
O'Hearn), 14 of the area's 41 schools were built before 
1910. 

Parochial Schools - In addition to the above public 
schools, the ^Dor Chester Study Area is served by 15 parochial 
schools, including 3 high schools, with a total enrollment 
of approximately 9,100 pupils. 

The following tables list public and parochial schools 
by neighborhoods, grades and 1968-69 enrollment: 



35 



CO 

to 



u 
to 

-§ 

•p 
o 
o 



CO 

o 

i 



CO 

s 

o 

CO 

o 

M 



g tp CD 



to o cr> 

CO to 00 to 



03 H 
•H H 
O -H 

w pq 00 
in in I 

II •\ o 



00 o o r~ g? 

<M 00 to 00 o 

.H CM H OO CV] 

H H 



■H 

o 

(U 

ft 

CO 

•N CVJ CVl 

!0 '=J< 05 H H 

I I i I I 

Jici W 05 



00 



CO 



Si 

•H OJ 

m CM 



o 
►o 











•H 












u 




-O 


o 










o 


d 


a 


CM 


CM 










CM 


•H 


•H 


:i 


CM 
















-P 




. ■ 






OJ 












CO 






C! 


■p 




to 


CO 


ha 


>-:) 






(U 


o 


CO 




CM 








d 


H 


•H 


CO 


(L) 


a 






d 




c3 


(U 


-P 


ft ,cl 


o 






o 


CO 




•H 


-P 


E 


o 




d 




CO 


H 




Ch 


•H 


O 






0) 


o 


H 


^1 


O 


•H 








CO 


(U 


•H 


•H 


•H 








E-t 


< 




cr; 


:3: 


C5 



OJ ^1 

-p 0) 

CO -H 

OJ PL, 

,d 
o 

O 



CM CM 

O LO 



O 

CM 

in 



00 H 

00 

CO CO 



00 

I 

CD lO 

•X I 



CD 



I 

CO 

+> 

u 

a* 



(U 

I 

03 

-P 
-P 

<b 

W 



CM 



o; ft 

CO Ph 

ro 03 

3 H 



X3 
ftl 



fO 



O LO 

03 ^ 



O 0) 



►o CO 

CD 
LO CM 



CD CD 



H 
H 

•H 

CO 

(D 



H 

to 

J>5tO 

03^ 



00 

to 
to 



ft d 



CO 

to 



H 


H 


H 


a 


0} 


03 


•H 


•H 


•H 


o 


O 


O 


0) 


<U 


(U 


ft 


ft 


ft 


m 


CO 


CO 






•\ 


CO to^ 
1 1 


CD 

1 


CD to 


W 


w 





CD 

>» 

0) 

rH 
P 

o 



CO 



;d 
4^ 
U 

o 

% 

-p 
;3 
o 

CO 



CD 

to 



to CM 
CO O 

to 



CD 
I 



CD CD 



(1) 




CO 






> 




H 




lO 


o 


to 


H 


to 


to 


u 


to 


•H 






C3 






p 


u 


in 




U 




o 


03 


d 


CD 


o3 




•xi 


d 


> 




>l 


CD 


cu 


O 


P 


o3 


O 




1-1 


CO 


EH 



LO CM to CJ5 O 
O O CD ^ CO 
LO CO ^ -vh ^ 



H H 

o5 o3 

•H -H 

O O 

0) QJ 

ft ft 

CO to 



cr> CD CD CD ^ 
W W W W 



05 



•H 

o o ■ 
•H H 



to 



rH 



d CM 
•H H 

03^ 
H 

ft 0) 

e d 
3 o 

O CO 



•H 
•H 



H O 00 O LO 
C7> CD to O H 00 
to to O H ^ 



CM 

to 
to 

to 

CM 



CD 
I 

to 



H 
03 
•H 

o 

(U 
ft 
CO 



03 

•H 

O 
OJ 
ft 
CO 



CM CD 05 to CD 
I •^ I I I I 

H W W to 



CD 

to 



•H 

W 

O 
•H 



CO P 
to ha 



d 
o3 



CD 



to to d 
O 

^ (U CO d 

CD d (D 0) 
O -H 



PQ EH t-il 



CD 4J 

d-g 

o o 

CO H 
o3 O 



O to CD 
C-~ H LO CD 
O to ^ 



CM ^ H ^ 
to H rH rH 

to LO LO CD 



H 
o3 
•H 

O 
0) 
ft 

CO 



H 
03 
•H 

O 
0) 
ft 

CO 



CD 0> to CD 
W W W 



H 
03 
•H 

O 
(U 
ft 

CO 



CD CD to CD 
I I I I 

w w w w 



tiO 
•H 

u 

o ^ 

•H 



'^H ^-D CD 

H H d 

v_^tj o3 

d QJ 

03 OJ -H 3 

(D > Xi 

W (D CO O 

- H d o 

O O K 



o 

CO ^ CM 
-H CD ■ 
^ H 



U CM 

o 



< ft 



^1 

pq CO 



i 




EH 




CO 




O 








s 








H 




D3 








O 












o 


O 


CO 






w 






o 





0) 

u 
CO 



CO 



cva 

CO 
CO 



CO 
CO 



o 

LO 

^0 



CO 

I 



CO 

I 



CO 



CO 

I 



-P 



-P 

CO 



•H 


H 




0) 






H 




> 






•H 




o 
















«1 




C5 


re 








Sh 






0) 








• 


Ph 


• 




• 


•P 


o 


-P 






CO 




CO 


o 


CO 



^1 

•H 

bO 

CJ o 
CO cn 

LO 00 



cvi 

rH 

LO 



to 



CO 

>» 

O 



CO 



CO H 
I I 

H CD 



CO 
H 



CO 



IM 
H 
I 

05 



U 
•H 



CO r~- 

8 



CVI 
GO H 

I I 

W CD 



o o 

(D 0) 

C!5 C5 



-P -P 

CO CO 



H 



CO 
I 

H 



























0) 








u 








cd 






o 


:=i 


(U 








^ c! 






CO 




o 








o 


•H 


-P 






f> 


-P 




CO 


(D 


0) 




s 




^ 














• 


> 


-p CD 


ft 


-P 




CO S 




CO 



LO 
lO 



CO 
I 

H 



o3 
ft 
cd 
-P 
-P 

I 



0) 



-p 

CO 



CVl 
CO 



CO 

I 

H 







bO 














•H 


rH 












M 


•H 














!xj 










-P 


(D 






W 




a 


tiO 


(U 










•H 


OJ 


CO 




OJ 






o 


H 


:=! 




a 


(U 




CM 


H 


o 




u 


CO 


•H 




O 




Ih 


o 


o 


H 




CJ 




0) 


o 


u 


H 


•H 






+3 






•H 




d 




<u 


CO 


1 


13: 




to 


•H 

-P 


Ph 


1 rl 
XCl 




• 




CO 


0) 


• 


0) 


• 




o 


o 




-P 


•H 


■p 


CO 


o 






CO 




CO 



-p 
a 

(U 

B 
■p 

u 
d 
ft 

<u 
Q 

o 

•H 

-P 

cd 
o 



o 
-p 

CO 
O 
pq 

o 

(U 
CO 
0) 

o 
o 

•H 

o 
U 
< 



o 

CO 



CD 


lO 




to 






o 


o 


H 








r- 


CVl 


CD 



cd 
-p 



s o 

(U o 

H (U 

W CO 



CO 

i 

o 

EH 



o 



•H 

(U 
OJ 
CQ 

C! 
o 

•H 

■S 
O 

o 

u 
o 



37 



LOCATION OF PUBLIC 
OPEN SPACE FACILITI 
DORCHESTER OVER 
ACRE IN SIZE 



Legend 

O school play3rounds 



other facilities 



Note: numbers refer to 
facilities listed on 
Table V. 




^RCHESTER 



DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 




2. Parks and Recreation 



The Dorchester District Planning Area is well served 
by 341 acres of parks and recreation facilities in 58 lo- 
cations. The major facilities include the Neponset River 
Valley Reservation (94 acres), Franklin Field (46 acres), 
Dorchester Park and Playground (27 acres), Almont Street 
Playground (l8 acres), Malihu Beach (l3 acres) and Ronan 
Park (l2 acres). Columbus Park which is adjacent to the 
planning area provides additional recreational opportunities 
for Dorchester residents. I While acreage in recreation 
facilities is adequate to serve the 148,000 residents of 
the planning area, the condition of many of these facilities 
is poor and in need of repair or replacement .J 

The City of Boston owns and operates over 200 acres 
of public open space in Dorchester while the Metropolitan 
District Commission operates over 134 acres. In addition, 
the Boston Housing Authority operates a seven-acre play- 
ground at Columbia Point. 

The following lists the acreage by type of facility: 

Reservation 94,00 
Beaches 24,80 



In addition, a complete listing of all Dorchester public 
open spaces by operating agency, location and acreage follows 
on the next two pages: 



Parks 

Playfields 
Playgrounds 
School Playgrounds 
Malls and squares 



32.69 
67o61 
81.16 
37.79 
3.75 



341.80 acres 



39 



CO 

u 
o 
< 



UDHCDCV3C0(MaD(Xl^cX)CVlCJ>[O 



H IT) CO 



r>- 00 ^ 



CD CD LT) 



8oo^OCD^OLO■^OJ^LD 



CD r~- 
H CD 



to 



a 
o 

•H 

o 
o 







o3 
















d 




o 




> 
















o 
































d 
























u 






•H 




d 








9 


p 


a 








d 


o3 


H -H 




1 




1 


> 


d 






•H 




(U 4d 








!h 


<u 




o 




d 


P 




!> CQ 









(U 




o3 


d) 




•H 










-P 


P 






1 




o3 






p 


tn 


p 


CO 


















0) 




+3 


D 




>S 




P 




o 




CQ 










<D 


o3 


d 


P 


to 




o o 


d 






o 


•H 


H 


cn 


o 


d 


S 


P 


■Vh d 


o 




CD 






ft 


(U 










u 3 


ft 


o 




o 


ft 


•H 


rH 








^ 


O H 


1) 






Q 


CO 


K 


PL, 


< 


pq 


<: 


EH 

















(D 


(L) 




H 




P 






•H 




•H 


•H 








d 


CQ 










(U 


d 


0) 






d 


•H 


CQ 


d 






O 


:i 











o 







o 








d 


m 


o 




o 


o3 


1 


pq 












d 


CQ 


d 


CQ 


•H 


o 




o3 


e 


P 


CQ 




H 


03 


(U 


•H 




ft T3 


0) 




< 


^3 


<: 







o 

o 
o 
d 

■d d 
I o 

•H O 











p 












p 






CQ 


CQ 


U 




d 










o 


,d 


ft 




ft 


o 


O 


o3 





u 


o 






o 






Q 


1 


!>5 


p 


1 


4J 









P 


H 


o 







CQ 


ft 


o 


H 










e 


rH 










rH 


u 


CQ 


u 







< 


EH 





p 

03 


ft 

O 

d 

o3 
P 

d 
S 

1^ 





CQ 




P 


• 


O 


p 




d 




o 


P 


o 


o 




EH 




o8 


o 


EH 






CQ 


o 




pq 






o 


o 








>H 




EH 

H 


03 
H 


O 


PL, 



d 

O 

d CQ 
pq o 



o P 

fn ^ 03 

bO PL, 
>i ^ 

03 O H 

H C::^ H 



CO O 
H ^ cv] 
— (J) — ' 

* — ^* 



CD 

nH rH 



d ^ 

3 o3 

O PlH 

1^ 

03 'H 

H P 

PM 




H d 
ft > 

•H O 
K EH 



^* 

^1 
O 

P u 
M 
S 
U o3 
P H 
P4 



d 

•H 

^ d 



p 

d 
o 



o3 



u 

< 

03 

rH 

:i PM 
o 

^ p 

M 
>^ 
Oi ^1 
H P 

PL) W 

03 ^ 



rH-^ 
C\J CO CM 




'd 



O O 
!h O ^ 
bO ^ hO 
>5 bO >> 
c!3 I>s c;3 

rH 03 rH 

Ph H PL, 
PM 




!> 
^1 

o3 
C5 



CO 

U 
03 

CQ 
o8 

CQ 
H 
H 



o3 

^ PL, 

o3 


H 
en o3 


P 

^ d 

S8 



0^ 

^ CM 



p 



!H 
03 U 





o3 

(J< 
^ M 
U 03 
" ^3 H 
a< H 




o3 

2^ - 

^ d § 

O 

d CQ Q 

o3 rH - 

Woo 



^ -i'J 
^ 03 

03 ^ o3 

^ Ph 

C3< CQ , 

CQ >5 

P 

!>5 P rH 

t:! CQ 

O rH 

S r-j 

03 rH 

0^0 

PL, EH :s: 



CO 


u 
o 
< 





o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 








CO 


8 


CD 


in 


CD 


in 


CD 




H 


in 


in 






CVl 


CD 


CD 


o 


CVl 


CO 


o 


o 


CD 


(J) 


CD 


in 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 


in 




CD 


o 


o 


• 


o 


o 


o 




o 


• 


o 


• 


o 


• 


• 




• 


• 


O 


o 


O 


• 


• 


• 


• 


to 






CD 




in 


OJ 


CD 




■sH 






CD 


CD 






H 


00 


H 


CM 


rH 


in 


o 














H 






CM 


CD 


05 














CM 


to 


H 




H 


CD 



d 
o 

•H 
P 

03 
o 
o 



•H 

P 

cS 

u 

<D 
ft 
O 



P 

ij d 
1.^ 



O 
P 

O 
•H 

> 



U 

P 

o3 





CM 





'd 


^^ 


o 


> >s > 





o 


H rH 


t> 


p 


pq H pq 


•H 


CQ 






1 


>3 O l>J 




O 


p 




CO 1 CO 





> 


CQ d ^ 


CQ 




•H 3 -H 


d 


H 


?H ^ 


o 


> d 


^ d Jh 


ft 


•H 03 


O O 





« o 


S &H S 












* 




in 


CD 










Xi 
o 




* 


* 


Qi 









pq 




o 


o 






d 


o3 


H 










H 




pq 


pq 


•H 


CQ 

















xi 






d 


o 


•H 





•H 


03 


H 


d 


> 





03 





03 


pq 


S 


EH 


CQ 









CM 








* 













H 




H 




03 




> 













> 


d 


•H 


o 


K 


•H 




P 


P 


o3 







CO 


t 


d 





o 


CQ 


ft 













pq 



o 
H 

rH 

O 
•H 
P 

d 

o 

CO 

o3 

U 
< 

oJ 

rH 
PL, 

p 
d 

•H 

o 
Ph 

o3 

•H 



rH 

o 
u 



o 

03 

rH 

O 



d 
o 
p 



o3 



I 

d 

•H 
•H O 

CO > 
o3 O 

:s pq 



'd 

d 
o 



o 

•H 



d 

o3 

H _ 

ft rd 

S !H 

O S 

PM C5 H 



CD O H 










* 


* 














u 






M 




o3 






U 




PM 




o3 


o3 




CQ 


PM 


Ph 




d 








o3 


•H 


d 


H 


U 


Ph 


O 


o 


H 





'd 


CO 


•H 


P 


P 




Ti 




CO 


P 


o 












pq 




d 


xi 








•H 


o 


^ 




o 






O 


i 


•H 




o 


o 






CQ 


Q 




< pq 



CO 
-d 

rH 



•H 

o3 
H 

PL, 





to 


* 




H 


'd 












CM 


* 




H 


d 


o 




u 




H 




* 









•H 


03 






rH 






PL, 


03 


d 




PL, 


•H 


ts 






u 




d 





d 


03 




O 


U 


o 


P5 







o 



oocococDtr)cocncn^r^a)OLqcviN^H 



CM 

lO t£i CO to 



a 
o 

•iH 
-P 

o 

o 




05 ^ 03 cd (D 
EH <; O pq rs 



•H 

P 

03 

?H 

CD 

ft 
o 

o3 

-p 

CD CJ 
E CD 

1-^ 



CD 
0) 



o 

•H 

-P 

03 
o 
o 
1-q 



•H 

-p 

03 
CD 

ft 
o 

03 

p 

CD C! 
CD 



(X) 



o 


* 










d 


















Oj 


p 


CD 








03 






bD 










U 




o3 * 




CD 


rH 










o 


CO 


% >. 




^ 


O 


H 


<u d 


d 


CD 


4d 


^1 


E a 


CD 


IS 


O 


•H 


CD CD 


CD 


CD 


CO 


C5 









FL| pc^ CO 









CVJ 












H 


H 
















to 




rH 










H 








* 


* 








* 




d 


d 


!-H 


* 








o 


o 


CD 




p 




p 




-p 


•H 


d 


p 


O 


U 


ft 


CD 


P 










03 


E 


CD 


P> 


CO 





>l 


:=! 


o 


H 


•H 




H 


o3 


-p 




•H 




•H 





EH 


CO 


EH 


EH 






r2 





CO 


CJ> 


to 









CD 


CD 


CM 


CM 


CD 


NO 


to 


H 




10 


H 








CD 







H 


CD 


LO 


NO 


CM 


CM 




CD 


CD 




H 




LO 


CD 










H 




H 




H 


OJ 


H 








H 


H 








































d 
































03 


H 

















03 








d 








U 




•H 


H 


CO 


-p 






rH 












H 











CD 






•H 


CD 


CD 



























+5 




,l 




H 















d 




CD 













W 








H 















03 














CD 




H 




CD 














d 









•r 






P 









H 


:s 


•H 




>, 


CO 













CO 








fn 










03 


1 




d 


Ti 


1 




o3 




d 


CO 


1 




H 


CO 


CD 




CO 


1 




d 


1 


CD 





'd 




EH 





1 




CD 


H 


•H 







•H 



















1 


d 


d 







H 


•H 


^ 


u 


Q 


pq 


•H 


d 


p> 





< 







-p 


CO 







■s 





r- 




o3 


CD 


1 


1 


o3 
















CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


o3 


> 


•H 




Ph 




(D 


d 


H ^ 


-p 




> 


U 


u 




CD 


H 


d 


> 


CO 


H 


> 


d 






U 





o3 


H 


•H 





o3 


o3 


CD 


> 




•H 




03 


CD 


P 


•H 


P 






CO 


CD !> 


CD 


^1 


H 






xi 


u 


^ 




• 


CD 




CO 


!> 


CO 




■s 




CO U 




CO 


H 






p 


o3 









rH 




CD 


03 


o3 


03 


CD 


•H 





03 


o3 


•H 






<; 







(r; 










CO 




P-, 












:s 


:s 







CO 












•d 

a 












roi 




































o3 










H 


H 


d 










PM 


•H 




d 








o3 




o3 




* 


H 


H 




H 









ft 


ft 


CD 


•H 









ft 


> 




CD 


^ 


J 


o3 


CD 


CO 


> 







H 


rH 


:=! 


CD 


CO 













Q 




!h 
O 
o3 

CD 

d 
o 









CD 


tiD 


CD 





•H 


> 


^ 













•H 




CO 




CD 


03 






d) 




CO 


U 




CD H 


cd 




(D 






-H 


* 


W o3 






— ' U 


-H 




pq 







7i 
tiO 
•H 
F14 

CJ 

o 

CO 

d 
o 

•H 

o 
o 



<iH 
•H 

0) 

•H 

CO 
CD 
CO 
CD 

CD 

o3 
ft 

d 

•H 

CO 
CD 



CD 
P 
O 



41 




LOCATION OF OTHER 
PUBLIC FACILITIES 
N DORCHESTER 



Legend 

B Library 
Hospital 
A Health Clinic 
C Welfare Office 

Police and Court 
O Fire Station 

Municipal Building 




II 




DORCHESTER 

DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 




3. Other Public Facilities 



Additional public facilities are scattered throughout 
the Dorchester Study Area. Again, however, many of these 
facilities are in fair condition. The symbols and numbers 
identify locations of these facilities on Fig. 12. 

H Libraries - Seven branches of the Boston Public 
Library serve the planning area; 



1. 


Uphams Corner 


500 Columbia Road 


2. 


Fields Corner 


1 Arcadia 


3. 


Mt. Bowdoin 


275 Washington 


4. 


Codman Square 


6 Norfolk 


5. 


Adams Street 


690 Adams Street 


6. 


Mattapan 


10 Hazelton 


7. 


Lower Mills 


110 Washington Street 




Hospitals - Four hospitals are located in the 



pla nning area, three in the vicinity of Uphams Corner and 
the other in the Lower Mills area. St. Margaret's 
Hospital (l), 90 Gushing Avenue, is a specialized obstetrics 
and gynecology facility; and St. Mary's Infant Asylum (2) 
and Hospital is located at the same address. The Harley 
Hospital (3), 6 Windemere Road, is located nearby. The 
Carney Hospital (4), 2100 Dorchester Avenue, specializes 
in surgical services. Also located here are the Mattapan 
Chronic Disease Hospital (s), Prendergast Preventorium (6) 
and Boston Home for Incurables (7). In addition, the Boston 
City Hospital and the Boston University Medical Center are 
very close to Dorchester. 




Health Clinics - Six health clinics are located 



in the planning area: 



1. 


Columbia Point 


270 Mt. Vernon Street 


2. 


Uphams Corner 


500 Columbia Road 


3. 


Field's Corner 


60 Gibson Street 


4. 


Franklin Field 


895 Blue Hill Avenue 


5. 


Codman Square 


6 Norfolk Street 


6. 


Mattapan 


294 River Street 



Five of these clinics offer well child care, dental 
care and TB clinic services, while the Boston Sanitorium 
Clinic serves recently discharged TB patients. A community 
mental health clinic at Boston State Hospital Is located 
adjacent to the planning area. 



43 



3 Welfare Offices - Seven welfare offices are 
located in Dorchester: 



1. Everett Square 20 W. Howell Street 

2. Coliirabia Point 320 Mt. Vernon Street 

3. Meeting House Hill 170 Hancock Street 

4. Franklin Field 280 Westview Street 

5. Franklin Field 170 Westview Street 

6. Lower Mills 1231 Adams Street 

7. Lower Mills 1175 Washington Street 

Police Protection and Courts - Washington Street 
provides a dividing line between Police Districts #11 and 
#3 which serve most of the planning area. Station #11 is 
presently located at 195 Adams Street (l) and Station #3 is 
located at 872 Morton Street(3). The planning area includes 
portions of three other districts, but the stations are not 
in the area. In addition to these police facilities, 
Dorchester District Court is located near Codman Square 
at 510 Washington Street (2). 

Fire Protection - The Boston Fire Headquarters 
and seven fire stations are located in the planning area. 
Department headquarters are located at 115 Southampton 
Street (l) and a fire station is located nearby at 900 
Massachusetts Avenue (2). Other stations are located at 
Uphams Corner (641 Columbia Road) (3), near Dorchester 
Square (l Parish Street) (4), 120 Callender Street (5), 
Peabody Square (1884 Dorchester Avenue) (6), 301 Neponset 
Avenue (7), and 9 Gallivan Boulevard (s). The planning 
area includes most of fire districts 7, 8 and parts of 
5 and 6. 

Municipal Building - The area's municipal buildings 
are located at 510 Columbia Road (l), and at' 8 Arcadia 
Street (2). These facilities house such services as a health 
clinic, branch library, auditorium and recreation center. 



45 




EXISTING TRANSPORTATION 
SYSTEM IN DORCHESTER 



Legend 



Expressway- 
Major arterials 
Collectors 



llllllllllllllll MBTA rapid transit line 

l l ll l l l llilllillll l li Railroad 





DORCHESTER 

DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 



TRANSPORTATION 



Transportation has greatly influenced the development 
of Dorchester because of its location in the most heavily 
travelled corridor in the Boston area. Three of the major 
reasons for this heavy travel are the Southeast Expressway, 
a rapid transit line, and a street system which is strongly 
oriented in a north-south direction. 

Roadway System 

Dorchester's present street and highway system provides 
access to downtown Boston as well as to surrounding com- 
munities. Major radial routes such as Dorchester Avenue, 
the Southeast Expressway and Morris sey Boulevard, leading 
from downtown Boston into adjacent suburban areas, are a 
consequence of historic growth patterns. Crosstown routes 
such as Centre Street, Savin Hill Avenue and Ashmont Street, 
in contrast, are generally limited in design and capacity. 

Most of the roads can adequately handle present traffic 
volimies, except at peak traffic hours. However, in the 
congested areas in the northern neighborhoods, there is little, 
if any, reserve capacity. The southern neighborhoods, on the 
other hand, have major east -west links (Gallivan Boulevard, 
Talbot Avenue and Morton Street ) which, together with Blue 
Hill Avenue, a wide north-south thoroughfare considerably 
ease travel in these directions. 

Transit Lines 

Six Red Line rapid transit stations serve Dorchester 
and provide rapid access to downtown Boston. These stops 
are Andrew, Columbia, Savin Hill, Fields Corner, Shawmut 
and Ashmont . Unlike the railroad line which forms a strong 
boundary to the west of the study area, the transit 
line, except where elevated, has created few, if any, 
serious obstructions. In addition to this transit service, 
a trolley line runs between the Ashmont terminal of the 
Red Line and Mattapan Square. There are seven stops on 
this route, three in Dorchester (Cedar Grove, Butler Street 
and Mattapan) and four just across the Neponset River in 
Milton. Both of these MBTA lines provide frequent service. 
Approximately thirty bus routes link most of the Dorchester 
neighborhoods to these transit lines. 

The MBTA provides limited parking facilities at Ashmont, 
Columbia and Forest Hills and large parking areas at Butler 
Street and Mattapan. Most of these facilities are relatively 
inexpensive . 



47 



Railroads 

The Nev York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Midland 
Division serves as a western boundary for the study area's 
northern neighborhoods. This division presently carries 
through trains, mostly freight, with no passenger service 
to Dorchester. 

Increase in the use of the railroad line can be expected 
when New York bound passenger trains are transferred to it 
in the early 1970' s. Most passenger trains presently use 
the Providence Division which runs through Jamaica Plain 
and which will be displaced by the proposed Southwest 
Expressway. 



49 




LOCATION OF 
MAJOR INDUSTRIES 
IN DORCHESTER 



Legend 

1. Globe Newspaper Company 

2. Thompson Wire Company 
Col-ombia Meat Company 
Peters & Company, Inc. 
American Brush Company 
North American Packing 
Couch Ordnance Company 
Kelley, 0. G. & Co., Inc. 
Stedfast Rubber Company 
Corrigan, J. C. Co., Inc. 

11. Modern Die & Machine Company 

12. Sturtevant Mill Company 



o 
•i 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 





DORCHESTER 



DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 




ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS 



Industry 

Manufacturing is located along the perimeter of the 
Dorchester study area. More specifically, industry is 
located to the north around New Market Square, to the 
east along the Southeast Expressway and Morrissey Boulevard, 
to the south along the Neponset River and to the west along 
the railroad (Midland Division). In addition, there are 
a few spots of manufacturing along major streets in Dorchester, 
most of them in the vicinity of main intersections. The 
items most commonly manufactiired are wood, metal, stone and 
machine products. 

Light manufacturing is most predominant along Dorchester 
Avenue, Blue Hill Avenue and Washington Street. These 
manufacturers produce textiles, glass, apparel, food 
products, synthetics, paper, electrical and chemical products 
and instruments. In addition, many commercial establishments 
are located along these major service routes. 

In general, while industry closely follows the zoning 
pattern for Dorchester, much of the industrial zoned land 
is underutilized and could provide additional space for 
new development and possible expansion. 

Commerce 

Local and retail businesses are prevalent throughout 
the study area and are located primarily along such major 
roadways as Blue Hill Avenue, Washington Street, Dorchester 
Avenue, Gallivan Boulevard, Morrissey Boulevard and 
Colimibia Road. In addition to these major concentrations of 
commercial activity, there are many smaller businesses located 
on secondary roads and at intersections. 

Shopping centers are also numerous with major centers 
located at: Columbia Point (Morrissey Boulevard at Mt. Vernon 
St.), Uphams Corner, Field's Corner, Gallivan Boulevard at 
Morrissey Boulevard, and Mattapan Square. 

Commerce also follows major zoning patterns as outlined 
for Dorchester. Commercial zones are found along all 
major arteries and cluster at most major intersections 
including Dorchester Avenue, Blue Hill Avenue, Washington 
Street and Neponset Avenue. In addition, many smaller zones 
are found along all major arteries and cluster at most 
major intersections including Dorchester Avenue, Blue Hill 
Avenue, Washington Street and Neponset Avenue. In addition, 
many smaller zones are located on secondary streets throughout 
the study area. 



51 




LOCATION OF MAJOR 
COMMERCIAL DISTRICTS 
IN DORCHESTER 



Legend 



1. Colxjmbia Point (new shopping center) 

2 . Upham ' s Corner 
5. Field's Corner 

4. Gallivan Boulevard 
and Morrissey Boulevard 

5 . Mattapan Square 





DORCHESTER 

DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 



Employment 1960 Census 



The total available labor force for Dorchester in 1960 
was about 78,000. Of this total, 74,500 were employed, 
leaving approximately 4^ unemployed. An analysis of the 
occupations within the working force shows a relatively 
balanced community, although there is a heavy emphasis on 
clerical and sales work. 

Employment appears to be maintained at a high rate 
although future opportunities will require an increasing 
number of skilled workers as manufacturers expand. Recently, 
APAC groups have set up training centers to aid in building 
a labor force capable of handling the increasing demands made 
by employers . 

The following table provides information on major 
industrial employers as well as the 1960 Census of Dorchester's 
labor force by occupation: 

MAJOR INDUSTRIES (numbers Identify locations of industries 

on Fig. 14) 

NAME NO. OF EMPLOYEES 



1. 


Globe Newspaper Company 


1,000 


2. 


Thompson Wire Company 


500-999 


3. 


Columbia Meat Company 


250-499 


4. 


Peters and Co., Inc. 


250-499 


5. 


American Brush Company 


100-249 


6. 


North American Packing 


100-249 


7. 


Couch Ordnance Company 


100-249 


8. 


Kelley, 0. G. & Co., Inc. 


100-249 


9. 


Stedfast Rubber Co., Inc. 


500-999 


10. 


Corrigan, J. C. Co., Inc. 


100-249 


11. 


Modern Die and Machine Company 


100-249 


12. 


Sturtevant Mill Company 


100-249 


(Source: Directory of Manufacturers 


in Greater Boston 



Chamber of Commerce, 1968) 



OCCUPATIONAL BREAKDOWN (i960 Census) 

Labor Force 77,874 
Number Employed 74,495 
Percent Unemployed avg. 4.5^ 

Occupational Type 



1. 


Professional, technical, managers. 


10,303 




officials and proprietors 




2. 


Clerical and sales 


23,347 


3. 


Craftsmen and foremen 


10,324 


4. 


Operatives 


14,706 


5. 


Private household, service. 


11,495 




laborers 





53 




EXTERNAL INFLUENCES 
ON DORCHESTER 



Proposed 
Jnner Belti 



\ 



\ C7/ 
\ 



\ 

Y.\ /// 



Proposed S.W. Express^ 
MBTA Rapid Transit Lit 



Model City 



Hig 



/ed Tr^ns- 



Univ. of Mass. 




Expo 76 

South East Exp. 

iputhshore 
J) Extension 




Suburban Growth 




DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 

BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 




EXTERNAL INFLUENCES 



Like any area, Dorchester is influenced by plans and 
activities which originate beyond, and often have purposes 
exterior to, its boundaries. Four major types of external 
influences are having, or will have, a significant effect 
on Dorchester: (l) transportation programs, (2) public and 
private improvement programs in Dorchester and adjacent 
neighborhoods, (s) development proposals for Columbia Point 
and Dorchester Bay, and (4) suburban growth. 

1. Transportation Programs 

The Southeast Corridor in which Dorchester is situated 
is the most heavily travelled radial transportation corridor 
in the Boston Metropolitan area. The rapid transit extension 
to the South Shore commiuaities, now under construction, will 
further extend and increase service in this corridor. This 
improved transportation service could stimulate development 
opportunities in Dorchester. 

The proposed Southwest Expressway, although located to 
the west of Dorchester, may also have significant effects 
on the study area. It should, at least initially, ease 
throiogh traffic volume on several major arteries. It will 
connect with the proposed Inner Belt which will join the 
Southeast Expressway on the northern edge of Dorchester. 
This system should greatly enhance development possibilities 
for the industrial zone near New Market Square by providing 
easy vehicular access from almost any approach to the City. 
Finally, the replacement of the New Haven Railroad tracks by 
the Southwest Expressway will increase traffic on the 
remaining Midland Division throiagh Dorchester, as this line 
is to become the route for the hi-speed train from Boston 
to New York City and Washington. 

2. Urban Improvement Programs 
The Model Cities Program 

Boston's Model City Area contains over 60,000 in- 
habitants and covers a large portion of Jamaica Plain, North 
Dorchester and Roxbiiry. The Model City Program is a 
combination of physical and social development efforts which 
will attack a variety of problems facing the residents of 
the area. The physical development efforts will concentrate 
upon rehabilitating existing housing and providing opportunities 
for resident ownerships The improvement of several existing 
parks and playgrounds and the eventual construction of new 
recreation facilities is also planned. 



55 



The Boston Rehabilitation Progi'am 

This program is sponsored hy FHA which provides low- 
interest loans to developers for rehabilitating existing 
structures for occupancy by middle-income families. Over 
600 units undei- this program are located in Dorchester. 
Since there are no requirements foi- relocation of the 
occupants, additional pressures are put on the housing 
market. A good percentage of the families displaced by the 
Dorchester pi-ogram were relocated within the area. In 
addition, 74 families displaced by the program in other 
areas were relocated in Dorchester. 

6. Columbia Point - Dorchester Bay Area Plans 

Planning is underway for major new developments on 
Columbia Point and adjacent Dorchester Bay which may 
significantly affect Dorchester. The developments include 
the Boston Campus of the University of Massachusetts as 
well as the possibility of a new community and a world's fair. 

The University of Massachusetts will locate its 
$55 mill ion Boston Campus on the vacant land at Columbia 
Point. With its anticipated enrollment of 15,000 students 
and 4,000 faculty and staff, it will bring considerable 
economic and social benefits to the Dorchester area including 
employment possibilities on its staff, and during the 
construction of the planned 5.5 million gross square feet of 
buildings. In addition, it will stimulate local business as 
well as provide other cultural and social benefits noi'mally 
associated with a university. 

The project which would have the lai'gest and most 
lasting impact on the Doi'chester area is the possibility of 
the development of a new community to be located in the 
Columbia Point - Dorchester Bay area. If this project and the 
University of Massachusetts project are both undertaken, they 
can be mutually beneficial by providing both employment 
opportunities and a housing stock in proximity to one another. 

In addition, another tentative development possibility 
is the U.S. Bicentennial World Exposition proposed for 
the Columbia Point - Thompson Island area of Dorchester Bay. 
The activities associated with expositions can be of 
significant economic benefit to the area in which they are 
located. This be tefit includes stimulation of existing and 
new businesses and expanded job opportunities. In addition, 
improved transportation service and other public facilities 
can be beneficial to adjoining areas if adequately planned. 



57 



4. Suburban Growth 



The Influences of the suburban towns lo'cated to the 
south of Dorchester cannot be overlooked. Several major 
shopping centers which are easily accessible to many- 
Dorchester residents are located in the Quincy and Braintree 
area. These large shopping centers may affect market areas 
such as Mattapan Square in southern Dorchester by drawing 
more and more consumers away from the smaller shopping 
areas. In addition, new industrial development in South 
Shore suburbs may affect the degree of further industrial 
development in Dorchester. 

Furthermore, the attractiveness of the residential 
environments in these towns will continue to compete with 
Dorchester for new residential and economic development. 



59 



LOCATION OF CURREN' 
& PROPOSED IMPROVEM 
PROGRAMS IN DORCHES' 







A 


Schools 


mm 


Parks 


® 


MBTA Station 




Code Enforcement Area 




MBTA South Shore Extension 


■ 


Library 



Note: letters and numbers 
refer to improvements 
listed in Section III of 
the report . 




DORCHESTER 

DISTRICT PLANNING PROGRAM 
BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 



CURRENT IMPROVEMENT 
PROGRAMS UNDERWAY 



There are several improvement efforts underway in 
Dorchester at the present time. A brief description of 
each follows: 

A. CONCENTEIATED CODE ENFORCEMENT AND REHABILITATION 
PROGRAM 

A large portion of the Fields Corner neighborhood has 
been approved and funded as a federally aided combined 
rehabilitation and code enforcement area. The area's 
boundaries are Melville Avenue, Adams Street, Bowdoin Street 
and Washington Street. The main purpose of the program is 
to conserve areas of standard housing by providing low- 
interest, long-term loans for rehabilitation as well as 
public improvements such as new streets, sidewalks and 
tree planting. The total program^ which also includes 
a portion of Jamaica Plain, will cost $4.8 million and will 
be administered by the Boston Housing Inspection Department. 

B. INFILL HOUSING PROGRAM 

The main purposes of Infill Housing is to increase the 
supply of large unit housing for low income families by 
developing vacant, city-owned properties. The program is 
city-wide in scope and several potential sites are located 
in Dorchester o 

C. TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENTS 

Several minor street improvements including resurfacing, 
better lightirig, and new sidewalks are planned by the City's 
Public Works Department. In addition, improvements to the 
Southeast Expressway are also contemplated. 

The MBTA plans to modernize Red Line rapid transit 
stations as a part of their current improvement and expansion 
program. Rapid transit extensions now being constructed 
to Quincy and other South Shore suburbs will not provide any 
new stations or parking facilities in Dorchester. They may, 
however, aid residents by increasing service, at least north 
of Columbia Station, where the new extension will connect 
with the existing Red Line. 

D. COMMUNITY FACILITIES BffiROVEMENT 

1. Schools (letters identify locations on Fig. 17) 

Three new schools will be constructed by 1970 and will 
service a portion of Dorchester. 



63 



I 
I 
I 
I 
i 

1 
i 

i 

•I 



New Marshall School (C) - A new kindergarten through 
grade 5 school will be constructed on the present site of 
the Marshall School and will accommodate 1,000 pupils. 
Grade 6 will be moved to the Holmes School which will be 
designated as a middle school. 

Olney Street School (a) - A new kindergarten through 
grade 5 school will be constructed to replace the Gibson 
and Atherton Schools and will accommodate 1,000 pupils. 

Joseph Lee School (d) - A new kindergarten through 
grade 5 will be constructed to replace three schools, the 
Champlain, the Whittier and the Nightingale. The new school 
will have a capacity of 1,100 pupils and will be located on 
the east side of Franklin Field on Talbot Avenue. 

At least two other new schools are planned for the 
Dorchester planning area in the near future. The Logue, 
Baker and Mason elementary schools are proposed for re- 
placement by a school in the vicinity of the Almont Street 
Playground. The Hemenway and Minot Schools will be replaced 
by either one or two new schools in the Pope's Hill - Neponset 
area. In addition, the Cleveland Junior High School (b ) is 
to be enlarged to include a new gymnasium, classrooms and a 
cafeteria . 

2. Parks and Recreation (numbers identify locations on 

Fig. 17 ) 

The following parks and playgrounds are scheduled for 
improvement in the 1968 Urban Beautif ication Program 
Application approved by the City Council. 

1968. Columbus Park (adjacent to planning area) (l) 

$20,000 for design, reconstruction of playfields, 
landscaping . 

1968. Dorchester Park (9) 

$32,000 for des ign, landscaping and play apparatus. 

1968. Almont Street Playground (s) 

$52,000 for design, landscaping, new tennis courts, 
and play apparatus . 

1969. Franklin Field (5) 

$40,000 for design, reconstruction of playfields, 
landscaping and tennis courts. 

1969. Gibson-Doherty Playground (4) 

$50,000 for des ign, landscaping and play apparatus. 

1969. Cronin Playground (6) 

$55,000 for design, landscaping and play apparatus. 



65 



1970. Ronan Park (s) 

$50,000 for design, landscaping and play apparatus. 



1970. Savin Hill Park (2) 

$25,000 for design and landscaping. 

1970. Hemenway Playground (7) 

$40,000 for design, landscaping and play apparatus. 

3. Libraries 

The existing Fields Corner Library is being replaced by 
a building under construction at the corner of Park Street 
and Dorchester Avenue. In addition, the Mt. Bowdoin branch 
now in rented space will be replaced by a new library in 
Grove Hall and the Lower Mills branch will be replaced by a 
new library in the Pierce Square area. 

4. Fire 

The fire station at 120 Callendar Street will be replaced 
somewhere on Blue Hill Avenue . 

5. Police 

A new District jfll police station is planned for 
construction on Gibson Street this year. 

6. Public Works Yard 

Funds for relocation of the Gibson Street Public 
Works yard to the Alsen Playground - Mapes Street area 
was approved by City Council in April, 1969. 



67 



MAJOR ISSUES AND 
PLANNING IMPLICATIONS 



Throughout this discussion of Dorchester, several 
dominant issues have been raised. These issues include: 
a growing elderly population, an out migration of young 
working age population, instability of changing neighbor- 
hoods, inadequate community facilities, housing deteriora- 
tion, absentee landlords of neglected property, traffic 
congestion and lack of parking in shopping districts, and 
the need for greater job opportunities. All of these have 
important implications for Dorchester and each deserves 
adequate attention as part of the District Planning Program. 

A brief description of these issues is detailed below: 
POPULATION CHANGES 

While Dorchester's total population has continued to 
decrease in recent years, the age and ethnic composition of 
the remaining population is changing significantly. One 
of the characteristics of this changing composition is that 
the out migration of young families has left a greater 
proportion of older people behind o Because of composition 
changes, planning in Dorchester will have to address itself 
to" the needs of a growing, elderly population as well as 
to the development of commimity improvement programs and 
opportunities which encourage younger age groups to remain 
in Dorchester. 

A second characteristic of the population is the change 
in ethnic composition. A rapidly increasing black popula- 
tion*, particularly along the western edge of the district, 
and a decreasing Jewish population in the Mattapan area are 
the most significant results of this ethnic movement o The 
increase in the black population has occurred, particularly 
in Uphams Corner, Franklin Field, Mattapan and Columbia Point. 
Much of the occurring black migration originated in Roxbury 
and includes a high proportion of large, low-income families. 
Many of these families are finding it difficult to locate 
adequate housing and are falling prey to slum landlords. This 
inadequate housing, coupled with a lack of proper maintenance, 
further increases deterioration. In addition, the rapid 
transition of ethnic composition has resulted in community 
concern. 



* According to United Community Services, the proportion of 

the black population to the total population of Boston increased 

from 9/0 to nio from 1960 to 1965. 



71 



In contrast to the "black in migration, the Jewish 
population, particularly the young families, are rapidly 
out migrating from the Mattapan area. Reasons include the 
changing and deteriorating neighborhoods, coupled with the 
normal appeal that suburbs have for young families. 

HOUSING DETERIORATION 

Although much of the housing in Dorchester is in stand- 
ard condition, pockets of poor housing can be found in al- 
most every neighborhood. Major causes of deterioration in- 
clude old age, inadequate maintenance, vacant structures, 
slum landlords, obsolete housing types, and the unplanned 
Inclusion of non-residential uses in residential neighbor- 
hoods. Once deterioration begins, it is difficult to arrest 
as it becomes a catalyst for further deterioration and re- 
sults in property neglect, property devaluation and loss of 
pride in a neighborhood. 

ABSENTEE LANDLORDS 

The increasing number of absentee landlords of neglected 
property in Dorchester is related to many issues - deteriorat- 
ing housing, vacant structures, out migration of long-term resi- 
dents and in migration of new ethnic groups. All of these 
characteristics are signals to some absentee landlords that 
opportunities may exist to buy properties in a particular 
neighborhood which is experiencing high occupancy turnover. 
Once such property has been sold to these landlords, property 
maintenance may continue to decrease and surrounding structures 
may also deteriorate. Again, an unpleasant environment is 
created and perpetuated in the community. 

LACK OF ENOUGH HOUSING REHABILITATION FUNDING 

With interest rates soaring for housing rehabilitation 
loans from private financial institutions, there is a defin- 
ite need to provide new low-interest rehabilitation loan and 
grant programs in Dorchester. Even with the recently estab- 
lished Boston Banks Group interest rates which are approximately 
7^ and which are available in several sections of northern and 
central Dorchester, many low-income homeowners cannot afford 
these rates. A comprehensive home improvement program, along 
with efforts such as the recently funded Rehabilitation Code 
Enforcement Program in Fields Corner, is necessary to make an 
effective impact on halting blight in Dorchester. 

TRAFFIC CONGESTION AND COMMERCIAL DETERIORATION IN 
SHOPPING DISTRICTS 

Main streets in commercial districts are congested with 



73 



through traffic which conflicts with shoppers attempting 
to locate parking places. In addition, many commercial 
districts are deteriorating because of inadequate mainten- 
ance and in part by decreases in business due to the 
new competition provided by large shopping centers with 
ample off street parking. More adequate off street parking 
and significant rehabilitation of commercial establishments 
is needed. 

ADDITIONAL JOB OPPORTUNITIES 

Although a large portion of Dorchester residents 
travel outside of the district to work, a certain number of 
jobs are available within the area at industrial and com- 
mercial concentrations. In order to encourage people to 
remain in the community, as well as to provide job oppor- 
tunities for new residents, it is necessary to establish 
programs of economic development and related job training. 
In addition, space for adequate and appropriate industrial 
development must be provided. 

INADEQUATE COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

A great number of public facilities in Dorchester 
are old and poorly maintained. For example, most of the 
schools are over 50 years old and are located on extremely 
inadequate sites. In addition, many of the parks and 
playgrounds are in poor condition. Good community facilities 
can" provide needed services and activities in a pleasant 
environment to all area residents. 

ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 

Altho\:igh not actually detailed in this report on 
Dorchester, several additional problems were outlined by 
community leaders. These include: the lack of adequate 
police protection, the necessity of providing more adequate 
housing and building code enforcement, the need to utilize 
vacant buildings and lots for a number of uses, and the lack 
of adequate municipal services. Thus, in addition to 
the above mentioned issues, it is important to carefully 
study these problems as well. 



75 



CONCLUSION 



While it is evident that Dorchester neighhorhoods have 
many resoiirces which are assets to the coram'unity, it is just 
as evident that there are as many problems which are neigh- 
borhood liabilities. In order to preserve Dorchester as a 
soimd and viable community, it is necessary to undertake 
actions which meet immediate needs, while developing longer- 
range plans for programmed improvement of the commmity. 

This report represents a first step in determining 
existing characteristics and problem areas o The next step 
involves the formation of a Dorchester Advisory Committee to 
examine this report, detail problem areas and determine 
recommendations for problem solving actions and the preparation 
of longer -range improvement piano 



79